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Alarming Statistics

The Data Is Frightening...

Whether you are an employer, employee, parent, school administrator or are in law enforcement the findings from recent studies lays testament to the grip that drugs and alcohol have on our society. 
 

Teen Drug Use Facts

  • More than 4 in 10 people who begin drinking before age 15 eventually become alcoholics. 
  • Since 1997, about 40% of high school students have regularly used or tried an illegal drug.
  • Rural Teens are 83% more likely to use crack cocaine, 34% more likely to smoke marijuana, and twice as likely to use amphetamines than teens in large cities.  Rural areas often have fewer prevention, enforcement, and rehabilitation resources than urban areas.  
  • September 2010 Report: 21.8 million Americans age 12 or older used illegal drugs in the past month, up from 19.7 million in 2006.
  • In 2007, prescription pain medications like Vicodin and OxyContin were involved in more overdose deaths than heroin and cocaine combined.

When your teen has a drug problem

Discovering your child uses drugs can generate fear, confusion, and anger in parents. It’s important to remain calm when confronting your teen, and only do so when everyone is sober. Explain your concerns and make it clear that your concern comes from a place of love. It’s important that your teen feels you are supportive.

Five steps parents
can take:

  • Lay down rules and consequences. Your teen should understand that using drugs comes with specific consequences. But don’t make hollow threats or set rules that you cannot enforce. Make sure your spouse agrees with the rules and is prepared to enforce them.
  • Monitor your teen’s activity. Know where your teen goes and who he or she hangs out with. It’s also important to routinely check potential hiding places for drugs—in backpacks, between books on a shelf, in DVD cases or make-up cases, for example. Explain to your teen that this lack of privacy is a consequence of him or her having been caught using drugs.
  • Encourage other interests and social activities. Expose your teen to healthy hobbies and activities, such as team sports and afterschool clubs.
  • Talk to your child about underlying issues. Drug use can be the result of other problems. Is your child having trouble fitting in? Has there been a recent major change, like a move or divorce, which is causing stress?
  • Get Help. Teenagers often rebel against their parents but if they hear the same information from a different authority figure, they may be more inclined to listen. Try a sports coach, family doctor, therapist, or drug counselor.
Teen Drug Abuse | Drug Abuse in Schools | Teenage Drug and Alcohol Testing

Are Drugs Being Used In School?

  • Daily Marijuana use increased among 8th, 10th, and 12th graders from 2009 to 2010. Among 12th graders it was at its highest point since the early 1980s at 6.1%. This year, perceived risk of regular marijuana use also declined among 10th and 12th graders suggesting future trends in use may continue upward.
  • After marijuana, prescription and over-the-counter medications account for most of the top drugs abused by 12th graders in the past year. Among 12th graders, past year non-medical use of Vicodin decreased from 9.7% to 8%. However, past year non-medical use of OxyContin remains unchanged across the three grades and has increased in 10th graders over the past 5 years.
  • After several years of decline, current and past year use of Ecstasy has risen among 8th and 10th graders. From 2009 to 2010, lifetime use of ecstasy among 8th graders increased from 2.2% to 3.3%, past year use from 1.3% to 2.4%, and current use 0.6% to 1.1%. 
  • According to the U.S. Department of Justice's Bureau of Justice Statistics, about 1/5 of all students in grades 9 through 12 reported someone offering, selling or giving them drugs on school property.
Drug Use Statistics | Workplace Drug Testing
  • According to the U.S. Department of Justice's Bureau of Justice Statistics, about 1/5 of all students in grades 9 through 12 reported someone offering, selling or giving them drugs on school property.
  • After several years of decline, current and past year use of Ecstasy has risen among 8th and 10th graders. From 2009 to 2010, lifetime use of ecstasy among 8th graders increased from 2.2% to 3.3%, past year use from 1.3% to 2.4%, and current use 0.6% to 1.1%. 

Drug Use In The Workplace

13 million Americans have an alcohol drinking problem. Their alcohol use has resulted in a criminal arrest, termination from their job, or family disruption such as divorce. It is important to realize that alcohol is a drug. In 2005, 2.5 million Americans received treatment for alcohol addiction. 
8 percent of full-time and 10.2 percent of part-time employees abuse illegal drugs.  The 2010 National Drug Treat Assessment published by the U.S. Dept. of Justice notes an increase in workplace drug abuse, primarily prescription narcotics. 
40% jump in employees testing positive for prescription narcotics from 2005-2009.  A November 18, 2010 report by Quest Diagnostics also found that post-accident drug tests are four-times more likely to find narcotics than pre-employment drug tests (3.7% vs. 0.78%). Vicodin is the most frequently found narcotic prescription drug of abuse. 
 
Non-professional drivers drug use. Sales people and other non-professional drivers operating a company car also put their employers and the public at risk while driving with drugs in their system. A November 30, 2010 National Highway Traffic Safety Administration federal report showed 18 percent of fatally injured drivers tested positive for illicit drugs, an increase from 2005 to 2009.
Alcohol is the most widely used drug in the United States: over 8% of employed adult workers and almost 11% of adults with Medicaid or no health insurance either abuse or are dependent on alcohol.
According to the U.S. Department of Labor, alcohol and drug abuse has been estimated to cost American businesses roughly 81 billion dollars in lost productivity in just one year, 37 billion due to premature death and 44 billion due to illness. Of these combined costs, 86 percent are attributed to drinking.
The 2012 National Survey on Drug Use and Health found the rate of binge drinking among people ages 65 and older was 8.2 percent, and the rate of heavy drinking was 2 percent. Among adults ages 50 to 64, the rate of current illicit drug use has increased during the past decade
Costs related to narcotic painkillers are growing for workplace insurers, which are currently spending an estimated $1.4 billion on the drugs, The New York Times reports. The companies are facing payouts to workers with injuries who are being treated with opioids, including many who do not return to work for months—or who don’t return at all.
Construction workers (15.6%), sales personnel (11.4%), food preparation, wait staff, and bartenders (11.2%), handlers, helpers, and laborers (10.6%,) and machine operators and inspectors (10.5%) reported the highest rates of current illicit drug use. Protective service workers reported the lowest rate of current drug use (3.2%).